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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Commanders of regiments, companies and privates! found in the catalog.

Commanders of regiments, companies and privates!

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by E. M. Lewis

  • 298 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Enquirer Job Press in Richmond, Va .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementE.M. Lewis
The Physical Object
Pagination1 broadside ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24588761M

Regimental Commanders. COL Jefferson C. Davis COL Henry M. Black – BG John J. Coppinger – COL Samuel Ovenshine – BG John M. Thompson – BG Philip Reade – COL Alfred G. Sharpe – MG Edwin F. Glenn – MG Chase W. Kennedy.   These are the stories of my Civil War ancestors. Orrin C. Reed, NY th, was fatally wounded at Lewis Farm in March, Samuel Chase Woodfin, TN 18th, fought at Atlanta and surrendered with Gen. Johnston in April, George Foster, NY d, was captured at Weldon Railroad and spent 10 months at Andersonville. John Tipton Womack, AL 2nd, .

  According to the Revised Regulations for the Army of the United States: Platoon - sub-division of troops less or more than a Company Company - four squads = 82 privates (this is not listing non-commissioned officers, e.g. Corporals, Sergeants or Commissioned Officers). The Connecticut Line was a formation within the Continental Army. The term "Connecticut Line" referred to the quota of numbered infantry regiments assigned to Connecticut at various times by the Continental Congress, the size of its allocation determined by the size of its population in relative to that of other states.

  Ive never seen an explanation of how many are in a typical company, how many company's per regiment etc. I want to know what the current make up of the U.S. military is like & how that compares to the Civil War, a period where you read a lot about companies, regiments & brigades. Also I want to know all the ranks for each branch of the military. Joseph Gibbs’ excellent book on the 11 th Pennsylvania Reserve Regiment explains well the origins the order of Companies and the functions of the flanking companies. Gibbs states that two flanking companies (in his case “A” and “K”) were stationed at the two ends of the regimental battle line.


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Commanders of regiments, companies and privates! by E. M. Lewis Download PDF EPUB FB2

A regiment is a military role and size varies markedly, depending on the country and the arm of service. In Medieval Europe, the term "regiment" denoted any large body of front-line soldiers, recruited or conscripted in one geographical area, by a leader who was often also the feudal lord of the soldiers.

By the end of the 17th century, regiments in most European armies. A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 80– soldiers and usually commanded by a major or a companies are formed of three to six platoons, although the exact number may vary by country, unit type, and structure.

Usually several companies are grouped as a battalion or regiment, the latter of which is sometimes formed by several battalions. The (Union) Regular regiments organized before the war (1stth) were 10 company regiments like the volunteers. When the NEW Regular regiments.

were authorized, a different organization was used. The new Regular regiments were organized 8 companies to a battalion and 2 battalions to the regiment. Thus new Regular regiments contained 16 companies.

Some regiments were very large, such as the 71 st highlander regiment. It had upwards of Commanders of regiments thousand men and was therefore divided into two battalions, 71 st first battalion and the 71 st second battalion, each having their own colonel and ten companies – basically two regiments in one.

[This became the norm later in the century and during the. These 10 companies needed Soldiers and companies and privates! book resulting in the selection of 10 (and later 13) men to command the newly authorized companies — the first company commanders in the national army.

The American Colonies went to war against the British Army on 19 April at Lexington Green with a force of volunteer colonial-controlled militia. They helped to keep a uniform line in the movement of the company.

Privates looked to corporals to help guide them during combat. PRIVATE. Privates served as the backbone of the army and did most of the fighting in battle. Privates moved together shoulder to shoulder in straight battle lines and acted on the commands of their company officers. Full text of "Records of the revolutionary war: containing the military and financial correspondence of distinguished officers; names of the officers and privates of regiments, companies, and corps, with the dates of their commissions and enlistments; general orders of Washington, Lee, and Greene, at Germantown and Valley Forge; with a list of distinguished prisoners of war; the.

"The book has a place on the shelves of battalion commanders, future battalion commanders, and the leadership and staffs of professional military institutions. Barry reminds his readers that the preparation before combat--be it in a classroom or in the field--reaps rewards, saves lives, and helps produce victory."--Infantry/5(11).

The next larger command unit was the REGIMENT. Infantry regiments consisted of ten companies designated by the letters “A” through “K”, excluding “J”. Cavalry and artillery regiments were composed of 12 companies and batteries respectively.

Each of the latter added “L” and “M” to their designations. The United States Army Regimental System (USARS) was established in to replace the Combat Arms Regimental System (CARS) to provide each soldier with continuous identification with a single regiment, and to increase a soldier's probability of serving recurring assignments with his or her USARS was intended to enhance combat effectiveness by.

Full text of "Records of the Revolutionary War: Containing the Military and Financial Correspondence of Distinguished Officers: Names of the Officers and Privates of Regiments, Companies, and Corps, with the Dates of Their Commissions and Enlistments; General Orders of Washington, Lee, and Greene, at Germantown and Valley Forge, with a List of Distinguished.

Many of these units were of company strength, supposed to number between 83 and men. Confederate authorities specified a minimum of 64 privates, and a maximum of Ten such companies of infantry, plus the field and staff officers, usually formed a regiment.

Cavalry and artillery regiments were designed to have twelve n: The required number of privates and officers of companies ranged from at a minimum (10 companies of a minimum of 83 men each) to a maximum of Thus the total number of men in a Regiment would consist of a minimum of to men by the Randall Proclamation.

WASHINGTON, May -- The list of commanding officers of the ten so-called immune regiments was completed to-day when the President sent to the Senate the names of. The four new artillery regiments numbered 36 companies—9 each—a total reduction of 6 companies, but of enlisted men—nearly 50 per cent.

Before this reduction there were in the artillery 1 colonel, 10 other field, and company officers—or 1 officer to men; afterwards, 4 colonels, 8 other field, and company officers, or 1.

A "Dutch-Uncle" approach to advising those who assume "first" command. Written by an Army officer primarily for Army company commanders, the book contains information, suggestions, & insights applicable to other services.

A ready reference for the company commander. Identifies tasks to complete & how to set new directions for the company; inspires confidence to 5/5(2).

Inprior to the start of the First World War, there were just o cavalrymen serving in thirty-one British Army cavalry regiments. There were three Household Cavalry regiments and twenty-eight line cavalry regiments consisting of seven dragoon guards, three dragoon, twelve hussar, and six lancer regiments.

In the British Army the term "cavalry" was only used for. Of the Organization of Light Infantry of the Regiments; And in particular that of the 55 th Regiment. By Richard F.C. Seidemann Jr. Inlight infantry companies were introduced into all the British foot regiments serving in North America, by order of Major General Jeffrey the time of the Seven Years War a British Regiment of Foot usually had one.

United States. Adjutant General's Office: Manual for noncommissioned officers and privates of infantry of the Army of the United States, to be used by Engineer companies (dismounted) and Coast Artillery companies for infantry instruction and training.

(New York: Military Publishing Co., [?]) (page images at HathiTrust) United States. A great book for historical information on Infantry regiments of the U.S.

Army. It covers dates, placed formed, larger commands assigned to and combat history. Read more5/5(1). A regiment consisted of 12 companies formed into 3 squadrons of 4 companies each. Besides the commanding officer who was a colonel, the regimental staff included 7 officers, 6 enlisted men, a surgeon, and 2 assistant surgeons.

Each company was authorized 4 officers, 15 noncommissioned officers, and 72 privates.The infantry regiment was the basic administrative and tactical unit of the Civil War armies.

Regimental headquarters consisted of a colonel, lieutenant colonel, major, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon (with rank of major), two assistant surgeons, a chaplain, sergeant major, quartermaster sergeant, commissary sergeant, hospital steward, and two principal musicians. This book "is a compendium of America's Indian Wars and the mountain men, soldiers, cowboys and pioneers who took part in them" (dust-jacket).

It includes information about all the major American Indian battles, the lives of notable men who fought in the battles, and the combat techniques employed. The index begins on page